Web Analytics

Senior Independent Living Floor Plans

Just because the elderly reside in senior independent living homes doesn’t mean that their floor plans are the same as yours. Let’s take a look at a few of the differences between independent living floor plans and the typical home in our society.

hero resized
Waterloo IL Senior Living from senior independent living floor plans, source: compass-living.com

One of the most noticeable differences is the size. With senior independent living, the rooms will be much smaller than those in a traditional two-bedroom home. Instead of having two large bedrooms, a resident might only have one bedroom but it may also contain a full bathroom.

The floors in the room may be deeper than your typical floor. These homes are usually decorated with more wood, which will create a warm atmosphere for the residents. The floor is deeper because you may have two sinks instead of one sink in a normal-sized home. Often, the floors in these homes are concrete or tile because the flooring material is much stronger than what is used in homes.

Lifespring of Millville 1200 North High St Millville NJ
Lifespring of Millville from senior independent living floor plans, source: rentalhousingdeals.com

One other difference is that you will not find kitchens in these homes. These homes do not have kitchens and the food will be prepared by the residents. They do however have refrigerators and washer/dryers so that the residents can prepare their meals for themselves.

To accommodate all of the residents, independent living floors must be designed differently. If you live in a five-bedroom home, a one-bedroom independent living home should be designed in a way that it will accommodate all of the residents. A four-bedroom independent living home will need to be designed in a way that it can accommodate the needs of only one resident.

Harbour Senior Living of South Hills
Harbour Senior Living of South Hills from senior independent living floor plans, source: seniorlifestyle.com

Since each resident will be doing a lot of the housework, the flooring and walls will need to be able to handle more than one person working on it. The floors should be able to take on a little more weight than a carpet and there should be no gaps that allow more weight to get through than necessary. It will take more than just one person to move heavy items around so these types of floors and walls will need to be able to handle this.

What this means is that the floor plan in an independent living home will be completely different than that in a traditional home. The furniture will have to be designed to accommodate one resident, so it needs to be constructed differently. This will mean that the furniture will need to be much more comfortable.

St Louis 2 Bedroom 1060 SF From $3800
Senior Living Floor Plans from senior independent living floor plans, source: stanthonyskc.com

There are many more differences between these floor plans and your typical home. Take a look at your floor plans today to see if you can adjust them to be more like a senior independent living home.

Lower Level Floor Plan
mon Space from senior independent living floor plans, source: stanthonyskc.com

crestwood ext
Custom Homes Made Easy from senior independent living floor plans, source: dreeshomes.com

1 Bedroom
Floor Plans – Lakeland Hills Senior Living from senior independent living floor plans, source: lakelandhillsseniorliving.com

Floor Plans
Alzheimer s Senior Care Arabella from senior independent living floor plans, source: arabellaseniorliving.com

The Bay
Floor Plans from senior independent living floor plans, source: graceseniorliving.com

St James 1 Bedroom 600 SF From $2900
Senior Living Floor Plans from senior independent living floor plans, source: stanthonyskc.com

You May Also Like